Time Lapse To Fall – Performed by Danny Green at TEDxSanDiego 2017

Written in September 2016, “Time Lapse To Fall,” was inspired by the imagery of the change in scenery from summer to fall. Summer is represented by the opening theme in Ab Major, whereas fall is represented in more introspective second theme, played in F minor.

Pianist and composer Danny Green is joined by bassist Justin Grinnell, drummer Julien Cantelm, violinist Isaac Allen, and cellist Erica Erenyi.

San Diego native Danny Green has garnered a reputation in the jazz community as an emerging artist whose music sounds simultaneously seasoned and fresh, showcasing a brilliant blend of jazz, Brazilian, Latin and classical elements. Green’s music engages listeners around the world with evocative melodies and infectious rhythms.

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What’s really in the air we breathe – Vicki Grassian at TEDxSanDiego 2017

Vicki begins by asking the question, “what do you think is in the air that we breathe?” Aerosols are rarely talked about, yet they are having a significant effect on the quality of the air we breathe.

These particles are typically a thousand times smaller than the width of a hair, and they come from a variety of sources, such as car exhaust and factories, as well as volcanoes and wildfires. The ocean also contributes to the story, with viruses, bacteria, phytoplankton and enzymes present in sea air.

In addition, dust particles from Asia find their way to the shores of the United States. Airborne particles such as these can negatively affect the upper respiratory tract, and recent research indicates that they can affect our brain.

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Is the universe a product of thermodynamic evolution? – Todd Hylton at TEDxSanDiego 2017

Todd Hylton suggests that the de facto assumption in most of the current scientific enterprise is that the organization of the universe is driven by a poorly understood or complex chain of causality that explains how everything works, and that the role of the scientist is to “get to the bottom of it”.

He begins his talk by questioning that no one can say with certainty how the universe came to be, but what if the answer was a non-mechanistic, anti-supernatural, evolutionary world view of how things came to exist? What if the big bang was simply an expression of pure potential leading to the creation, evolution, and existence of everything in the universe?

Could our existence be a product of thermodynamic evolution, he asks, and if so, can we someday build thermodynamic computers that evolve in the world on their own?

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