Humanizing the refugee crisis – Brian Sokol at TEDxSanDiego 2017

In this modern and brilliant discussion of the refugee crisis, Brian Sokol describes the devastating reality of the refugees who have fled from South Sudan to the border of Uganda in search of a better life for themselves and their children. He experiences them with great decency, humanity, and respect, as he came to know them individually on his journey as a photojournalist.

Sokol cautions the audience that statistics alone do not describe this group of people, but instead, lead to pity and shame. He asks, “how often do we use stats to describe people we love?” If we are to understand the reality of the refugee crisis then we need to hear their stories, and see what’s in their hearts. He argues that statistics dehumanize the 2.1 million people who fled to Uganda, and they are good human beings who are desperate for a better and safer life.

Brian Sokol Website

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TEDx in Review 2017

Since it’s inception in 2009, the world of TEDx has continued to expand around the globe, and in 2017 reached a new milestone as the 100,000 TEDx Talk was published. And in 2017 alone these talks were viewed in excess of 1 billion times. The reach of TEDx continued to increase, with 3,775 events attracting some 585,067 people. To date these talks have been given in 103 languages, across 190 countries, and in 2,500+ cities.

In 2017 TEDxSanDiego held its 8th annual event, and we’ll be bringing more amazing speakers to the stage in 2018!

100000 TEDx Talks 2017

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Ending the Arms Race with Infectious Diseases – Janelle Ayres at TEDxSanDiego 2016

There’s a war going on in the U.S. that you may not know exists.

“The scary fact is that it’s an arms race that we can never win,” said Janelle Ayres to start her talk at TEDxSanDiego.

So what is this war Ayres speaks of that is not winnable? Infectious diseases.

No, there are no real guns and ammunition involved in this war, but doctors and scientists have been throwing an arsenal of antibiotics at infectious diseases for many, many years to no avail.

Dr. Ayres, who has a PhD from Stanford University School of Medicine in Microbiology and Immunology, focuses her research on both infectious and non-infectious diseases, particularly the microbiome living on our bodies, as a means to end these diseases and prevent antibiotic resistance.

“Instead of asking ‘how do we fight infections?’ we should be asking ‘how do we survive infections?’,” Ayres said. “And I know that single word change from fight to survive seems simple, but by making that single change, we’ve completely changed the meaning of the question. And if we can understand the answer to this question, we will completely change the way we treat infectious diseases.”

Ayres and her team at the Salk Institute are working on developing strategies that promote survival without driving drug resistance – all to find a way to win the war against pestilence.

“We’re all vulnerable to the threat of contracting an infectious disease, and we’re all terrified of that threat,” she said. “But if you leave here with one thing today, I want you to leave here believing that there’s hope.”

Janelle Ayres Profile

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