Where Do You Go for Transformation? – Navrina Singh at TEDxSanDiego 2016

A part of Navrina Singh lives in your daily life.

You see, Singh is an engineer – one whom played a part in a development team at Qualcomm that enabled sending data other than voice over wireless networks, which helps run the apps on your smart phone.

“It is truly humbling to know that my life’s work powers your life and your work,” Singh said during her talk at TEDxSanDiego.

It was this very technology – along with her nearly 2-year-old daughter and grandmother – that also transformed the way Singh lives her life today.

It was a moment in time where Singh drew upon what she knew as an engineer and applied those principals to help engineer a self transformation – to close the gap between who she was and who she inspired to be.

In the case of self transformation, how do you analyze and measure how your mind, body and soul are evolving based on the changes you are making every day?

“What helped me was to think of myself of myself like a smart phone,” Singh said. “That each and every day I had an opportunity to release a new version of myself into this world. Each and every day was an opportunity to do over.”

In the end, Singh recognized that self-transformation is a lifelong journey, a work in progress. By giving up the idea that one day she would wake up and be a new person, her life got a new meaning.

Navrina Singh on LinkedIn

Navrina Singh on Twitter

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There’s Nothing More Personal Than Your Genome – Dawn Barry at TEDxSanDiego 2016

“Let’s not just wait for things to break, especially when those things can be the lives of the people we love,” concluded Dawn Barry at the end of her presentation during the TEDxSanDiego’s 2016 event on Oct. 22 at Copley Symphony Hall.

Barry, vice president, Applied Genomics at Illumina, was referring to the power of sequencing the human genome, which in simple terms she described as a code, or instructions for life – the entire collection of one’s DNA.

“Your genome holds the promise to help predict your health,” said Barry. “Your genome is an instruction manual for you, but it’s not your destiny.”

Certain factors such as lifestyle, environment and nutrition can play a role for or against your genome, but is there a way to do better than just react to such health issues as chemo therapy resistant cancer?

Recent technology developed in San Diego allows for entire genomes – once taking 13 years and $3 billion to complete for a single genome – to be sequenced in one day at a cost of about $1,000.

“There is no question that we have improved patient care and even saved lives based on genomics,” Barry said. “We know the technology works, but we don’t know enough yet for it to be applied preventatively, proactively.”

So what’s holding science back from getting ahead of disease?

Simply put, Barry stated the existing sample size is neither large enough, nor diverse enough to be able to be applied preventatively. By engaging the community, Barry said she believes this could help to put the parts and pieces together.

Dawn Barry on LinkedIn

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Using Modern Technology to Legitimize Elections – Lori Steele Contorer at TEDxSanDiego 2015

“If there’s a problem, and you aren’t part of the solution, you are in fact, part of the problem.” Lori Steele Contorer, the top expert in election modernization, identifies a problem with one of the most important social processes in the world: voting.

Lori recalls the U.S. election of 2000 when ballot voting issues caused the Supreme Court to elect the President, rather than the people. She also discusses worse incidences that occurred in other countries, such as ballot box stuffing, the stealing or burning of entire ballot boxes, violence and massacres at voting booths, and other dangerous election manipulations. Consequently, Contorer asserts that voting manually, using only paper ballots, remains a serious problem.

Contorer points to examples of self-driving cars, personal drones, DNA sampling, and extraterrestrial robots to illustrate how we live in extraordinarily innovative times. Due to these impressive accomplishments, you would think that every mission-critical industry in the world would use technology to ensure the best possible execution of their goals.

Unfortunately, the same people who say that paper ballots are secure, accurate, and reliable ways of voting, also claim that modern technology cannot be used for managing elections, because elections are far too important.

However, Contorer has experimented with integrating technology and voting in state elections, with the military, and in reputable institutions like the Oscars, and she has demonstrated proven success, showing how technology increases accuracy and security in elections, while increasing voter participation. Lori Steele Contorer believes that the technology revolution needs to be part of the election process so that people know they can make very important decisions, that their voice will be heard, and that they can trust the results.

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